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Why Brexit Emphasises the Importance of Good SEO

Why Brexit Emphasises the Importance of Good SEO

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When the UK voted to leave the European Union following last year’s shock referendum result, many people – including digital marketers – were left reeling at the decision.

Theresa May Brexit

When the referendum took place on 23rd June 2016, despite London, Northern Ireland and Scotland voting to remain in the EU, the ‘leave’ lobby won 52% of the votes and the Brexit preparations began. One thing’s clear: the result underlines the importance of clever marketing strategies to achieve brand awareness and to help promote sales during these uncertain times.

Immediately after the referendum, the British pound sank to its lowest level against the US dollar since 1985, and the then Prime Minister, David Cameron, announced he was to resign in October, saying he wasn’t the right person to lead Britain forward.

 

Digital marketing fight-back

However, despite the initial confusion following the unexpected result, with warnings that the uncertainty would slow the decision-making process and deter business activity, the digital marketing industry is fighting back with clear strategies to counter the wave of negativity sweeping the country.

According to the Incorporated Society of British Advertisers (the voice of British advertising), the UK’s advertising industry is still a strong global player and the body remains confident that the Brexit vote will provide opportunities once the dust has settled.

It is estimated that Britain will remain in the EU for at least another two years, possibly longer, so ISBA advises it’s not a time for rash decisions in business, as the nature of the UK’s new relationship with Brussels isn’t yet clear.

Debate throughout Brexit revolved around the Digital Single Market, as the ‘leave’ vote was aimed at cementing the UK’s place as a global leader in the digital economy. Now the initial shock waves have abated, and the economy has begun to settle down again, digital marketers are forming an opinion that Brexit need not have a negative impact on SEO.

 

Good SEO is crucial

Pivotal to this belief is the importance of using a good SEO agency. Using a reputable company is crucial, as it must be able to deliver good SEO results, while also showing how its work has impacted on Google rankings and increased the number of visitors as a result. This trend must repeat itself every month, getting more dynamic and creative, with the results growing continually and visitor numbers steadily increasing.

Google holds the monopoly on our digital economy, holding around 90% of Europe’s market share, so where will Brexit leave your web marketing? As no-one knows how it will affect British businesses, either short-term or long-term, business leaders are emphasising the importance of SEO again and again.

Using a reputable company for SEO will mean you’re not penalised by Google for bad SEO. Many people may not be aware of this, but Google can make your blog disappear from search results! Traffic is trickling to your posts, it grows with each post you publish and you’re hopeful Google will be a major source of traffic but suddenly, it simply stops, without any warning, leaving you with no idea why.

 

SEO deadly sins

Bad SEO is usually the reason – and you can fall foul of Google for committing any number of errors that you may not even be aware of! Google tweaks its algorithms every day to filter out spammers. It also rolls out regular updates that cause shifts in search engine rankings. So potentially, your search engine results can drop overnight – sometimes, by dozens of pages – especially if you do something wrong.

SEO

The deadly sins that bad SEO agencies can commit include buying links – so if you ever see an advert asking for a fee, with the promise of getting hundreds of links and a first page ranking, ignore it! Almost always, the links are from disreputable spam sites that will hinder rather than help you.

If you join the wrong link directories, you may also find yourself penalised. Google considers the web consists of good or bad ‘neighbourhoods’. If your blog appears next to sites that are trusted, you are part of the good neighbourhood, but if your links come from pages that are linked to hundreds of junk sites, this is considered a bad neighbourhood – you may be found guilty by association.

Another sin is ‘keyword stuffing’, whereby you use a keyword over and over hoping it will get you a higher ranking. If you take keyword density too far, it can actually hurt you.

One of Google’s top concerns is providing a good user experience, so if the articles people find are stuffed with so many keywords they’re barely readable, they’re going to stop using Google to search the web. Some SEO experts believe Google actively penalises keyword stuffing for this reason.

These are just a few of the ways that bad SEO can see you fall foul of Google, which is the last thing you want when everyone is vying for top spot in today’s post-Brexit vote climate.

 

Benefits of good SEO

The benefits of good SEO are plentiful – how and where you communicate your marketing messages will be crucial to your success, ensuring you speak to your target audience in a voice they can relate to. Brand recognition is equally important. Although this is probably a coincidence, when the referendum took place, the ‘leave’ lobby had the best brand – #brexit – which was easily recognisable.

Your brand influences how customers view your products and services on an emotional level. Having a good brand builds identity, recognition, trust and desire, so when you get this right, your other marketing will become so much easier.

Page1’s SEO services can help to improve your organic search presence on Google and other search engines – which may be critical to your business if you haven’t fared too well since the Brexit vote. Please feel free to contact us to find out how our full range of services can help give your business a post-Brexit boost.

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